Breaking Into the Product Photography Market (Part 2 – Choosing a Marketplace)

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If you’ve decided that the product photography industry would be a good fit for you, that’s great! From here, it’s time to consider the specific markets and segments that you’d like to focus on.

First, you should understand and choose the marketplace where your customers are going to be selling. The major players are as follows:

Amazon

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The largest player and easiest market to break into is the Amazon market. There are two main reasons. First, the company operates at a scale way beyond its competitors, providing more potential customers needing photographers. Second, Amazon has incredibly strict guidelines for its photography. Main images for a listing on the platform have to fit numerous standards, the most important of which is the need to have a pure white background (RGB 255, 255, 255). This is an immediate barrier to entry for many sellers that want to take their own pictures. Thus, even in the low-end of this market, sellers often have to hire professional photographers that have the ability to shoot according to Amazon’s standards. This provides a huge opportunity for photographers, and is especially good for those interested in photographing one-off products.

Shopify

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While Shopify isn’t a central marketplace in the same way as Amazon is, it has an incredibly connected community of sellers and experts. Sellers on the platform are constantly sharing resources and tips, which includes their go-to photographer. Additionally, Shopify has an Expert Program that allows you to partner with them and advertise your service to customers for free. This is an excellent way to get a slow-but-steady stream of clients. Specifically, it is perfect for getting clients that need huge batches of products photographed for their websites. This means your business can succeed with a lower number of big deals and partnerships, compared to the much higher number of lower-paying one-off jobs usually found through Amazon.

eBay

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There’s not a ton to say about eBay honestly. It is important to keep the company on your radar, but it is definitely harder to break into and make a good return from than the first two platforms mentioned. This is because customers on eBay tend to expect (and even desire) a lower-quality standard of photography, even from professional sellers. In fact, if the quality on a listing is too good, customers on eBay can easily start suspecting that the images aren’t representative of the products they illustrate. However, eBay does have an incredibly close community of sellers, and provides a great market for those wanting to do more quick, straightforward work in the product photography industry, versus the specialized, technical work of Amazon photography.

Etsy

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Etsy is a small but gratifying market to build a presence in. Customers aren’t going to come out of the woodwork for your service on Etsy like they will on Amazon and Shopify, but the shoots tend to be more enjoyable and clients tend to be more relaxed about the results. This is a great market for those that are more creatively driven, and enjoy the positioning and setting up of products rather than the editing process. The easiest way to break into Easy can honestly be to reach out cold to potential customers and have an honest discussion about their inferior photography. Don’t be afraid to give sellers advice on their photography, even if you get nothing in return. This builds good will with the customer and may even drive referrals to your business.

Be on the lookout for the final part of this series coming soon. Hope this has been helpful to you! If you enjoyed reading, continue subscribing in the sidebar.

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