Breaking Into the Product Photography Market (Part 1 – Background)

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Product photography can be a difficult industry to break into, but there’s actually an incredible amount of demand within this space. Because of this, it never feels cut-throat, and there always feels like room to grow in the industry. However, different photography industries are better suited for different kinds of people. Some people can’t stand wedding photography but love gallery shows, while other people have an aversion to galleries but enjoy commercial photography. Everyone is different, and the product photography industry can be particularly polarizing. On this subject, I remember something my pastor told me a couple years ago:

I’ve met a lot of people that have recovered from failure. I’ve met very few people that have recovered from success.

The danger here isn’t trying to break into a market and failing; it’s the opposite. If you’re not careful when choosing the right place in the photography industry, you may find yourself at the head of an incredibly successful business, in an field that you want nothing to do with and feeling miserable.

Before you decide if this industry is for you, consider a little of my background first…

I have often been asked why I chose the field of product photography. Initially, for several years, I experimented with making my way in the photography world via portraiture and commercial photography. Those were great years and helped me to understand the value of my time and work, and many of the clients I had the pleasure of working with genuinely brightened each day. However, I ultimately found the senior portraits, headshots, etc. somewhat unfulfilling (though not all people will!) and not in line with my skill set. At the time, I was also developing the strong desire to build a photography business that had the opportunity to scale up. In other words, I wanted to create a vibrant business and not just be a photographer, an ambition that is more viable with product photography. It is worth mentioning that not every photographer should think this way. Many people that are driven more by the creative side of photography than the problem-solving and business aspects of it, and may find product photography to be a poor fit.

You should always be skeptical of anyone that says they plan to start a photography company that will scale up, because the reality is that it rarely happens. Less than 3% of all photography businesses in the US have more than 4 employees according to IBIS World, which means you’ll likely never be growing a company past that point. However, scale doesn’t necessarily have to do with employees; it can also relate to finding a market where you can gradually increase your prices or increase your number of sales. This is where product photography becomes a viable industry. It is a space that has tons of room on the low end (i.e. shooting for first-time sellers on Amazon) and lots of room to grow upwards to bigger companies.

Now that we’ve covered the background and the validity of the product photography market, my next post will continue with steps you should follow to choose your scope and niche.

Hope this was helpful to you; thanks for reading!