5 Product Photography Tips from Professionals

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When you don’t know what to do, do what’s right and what’s in front of you. But not necessarily what’s right in front of you.

– Brent Weeks

Product Photography is (rightfully) seen as one of the most complicated and difficult niches in the photography world, but it’s also one that many non-photographers are thrown into.

There are thousands of sole proprietors pouring their time and hearts into making and releasing great products across the web, and most have never touched a professional camera before. Being thrown into this world can be intimidating, but knowing a little can go a long way towards improving the quality of your listings and saving you a lot of money. Whether you’re an Amazon seller, a marketer, or a budding photographer, here’s 5 short product photography tips to get you started in the field…

1. Learning a little about light goes a long way

Product photography in its simplest form is about understanding how light behaves and reacts to different surfaces and colors. Move your product around when taking photos to experiment with different amounts of reflection, illumination and brightness. Do not photograph your product in a room without studio lights or windows. Here’s a couple of basics:

  • Light is your best friend; get as much of it as possible! I don’t mean get 50 lamps piled into your bedroom studio, but avoid dark locations. They will leave parts of your images out of focus and make the colors worse.
  • Color temperature is how warm the colors are of the light is around you (more orange/red = warm CT). White background photos typically look best at a cooler color temperature, so no lousy house lighting. Try shooting in natural light for an easy fix.

Take a look at this post to get a better understanding of color temperature and light.

2. No budget? Go natural

As a general rule, if you can’t or don’t want to pay for a product photographer, you won’t want to spend enough to get a lighting setup that will outperform natural light. Try going to a local arts store, picking up a large sheet of soft white paper, taping it to a wall with easy access to a natural light, and shooting your photos in the early morning for the softest light and best color temperature.

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3. Sweat the details!

Things small enough that you would never notice in person can become huge issues when reviewing your photos. Take the time to prepare a product with as few scratches and blemishes as possible, wipe down every surface, and clean your product with a camera lens/eyeglass cloth every few minutes during your shoot to get rid of smudges and dust.

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4. Editing is Cheap, Easy, and Necessary

No matter how hard you try, there will always be blemishes on your product, and no matter how good your background is when you are photographing it, it will never result in the pure white that you need for webpages. $10 a month will get you access to Adobe’s full suite of photography applications on your computer and on mobile. For the PC/Mac, try options as simple as Photoshop’s paint bucket tool to make your background a pure white, or Lightroom’s excellent blemish-removing features. For iOS, try Adobe’s Photoshop Fix or Pixelmator for blemish removal, and Photoshop Mix for background removal. If you want a more professional solution, try Affinity Photo.

5. Know Your Platform

Each online platform like Amazon, eBay, and Etsy has its own guidelines for product photography. Amazon has especially strict guidelines for their listings, so take a couple minutes to look over the guidelines for the platforms you’ll be selling on. Also keep in mind things like image size when uploading your photos. Huge images = huge load times, so take the time to optimize your images for the platform you upload them to.

Amazon Guidelines

Ebay Guidelines

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